Friday, June 4, 2010

our feathered friends need our help


The photos BP doesn't want you to see

AP photographer Charles Riedel [has] filed some of the most disturbing images yet of the effect the BP oil spill is having on Gulf Coast birds.


photo by Win McNamee. From a photo series on the Toronto Star online.

5 comments:

Ari said...

BP is going to pay more than 10 billion dollars dividends to its shareholders. It it very disgusting, it doesn't help the nature at all.
This is how our world will be totally destroyed.

Katja Maki said...

These photos are so heartwrenching. When I saw them last night, I could not sleep, worrying about the wonderful birds and creatures whose home has been destroyed and will always be destroyed. It can never be fixed. BP has to pay a big penalty for this, causing so much damage to our earth. If they can put an oilwell in the gulf then why were there not procedures in place if something horrible happens. They put in an oilwell but did not think of what might happen and plan for it. how idiotic! But this is how it is with anything, big companies can extract whatever they want from Mother Earth but never have to pay the consequences if something happens or if they have taken all the resources. Then they leave their mess for Mother Nature to clean up. Well she can't clean this! I am so distraught!

northshorewoman said...

Hello Ari and Katja,

It such a senseless unnecessary tragedy/crime. Put the people in charge immediately into jail. Where are the laws? Wimpy. The laws that are in place cannot prevent disaster.

At least in South America, Mother Earth's rights are being put into law. Why are corporations given rights under neoliberal capitalism but not the spectrum of Mother Earth?

Indeed, the US (and Canada) shuns Mother Earth's Rights.

http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2010/04/bolivia-us-shuns-rights-of-mother-earth.html

eastwitching said...

I feel sick seeing these picture yet these will help stop this devastation occurring again I HOPE.

Ari said...

If this kind of disaster would happen somewhere in Northern regions perhaps in Labrador, Newfoundland or in the Arctic Ocean area, the whole northern hemisphere would be empty of life.
Someone has written that the conrol in Newfoundland is weaker than in Caribbean area. Then we can say goodbye to the rest of polar bears etc.